The beauty of old Mangalorean homes: A photo feature

It’s been a while since I blogged, and I must thank all those who wrote in inquiring when they would see us back in action. Well, we are not there yet, but we are certainly getting there. I was going over a website that features news pertaining to my hometown Mangalore, and I saw something that made me want to share these images with you.

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

With Mangalore tiles, wrap-around verandas, detailed filigree work, and their distinct designs, trademark interior details such as the family altar, marble table tops, vokil benches, etc. Mangalore homes have a charm of their own. Unfortunately, modernization has brought down many of these homes to give way to high rises. On a holiday to my hometown last year, I went around capturing some really beautiful still-upright homes as part of a private project, and I think this is a great time to share some of these images with you (unfortunately I can’t share all the pictures until the project is complete).

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The images that follow are of 2 homes in and around Mangalore, one restored and the other, quite astonishingly trans-located to bring back their past glories. These images are courtesy Daijiworld.com. I saved them for the last on purpose so that you can get a feel of the beauty and grandeur that the homes pictured above must have once proudly portrayed.

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

The beauty of old Mangalorean homes

Aren’t they beautifully restored? I am trying to get in touch with the architect who handled these 2 restoration projects and I hope to feature the home tours here soon.
 

 

14 Comments

  1. WOW!! What a blend of old and modern. Love those houses. My grandparent's house near Belur is a typical coffee plantation house, like a railway station with lot of rooms and space! 😀

    Love those wrap around Verandas or porch as we call it here!

     
  2. Welcome back Sharon! Lovely post and gorgeous pics…

     
  3. lookin at the pics,..i just feel like gnhg there

     
  4. Gorgeous Photos!

     
  5. How beautiful…great post ad good to have you back.

     
  6. wow I didnt know you were from Mangalore.. whose houses are these? it sort of resembles some of hte houses that I've seen in Bejai area.. but not sure.. really lovely! I also follow Daijiworld quite a lot!

     
  7. As soon as I saw the word Mangalore in my bloglist, I just went
    Me! me!me!…. like I was the only one…. But still our place always rings a special bell in our hearts & minds….. For me it does…. One of my mamas friends place was a similar one, whom I visited very often as a kid…. I loved the house & its space….. I always long for such places…. Very much depicting our culture & its grandeur….. Thanks for sharing & taking me along….. with my thoughts…..

    Ash….
    (http://asha-oceanichope.blogspot.com/)

     
  8. Oh my gosh… such a beautiful post.. I love these homes… all of them… wow!! Sharon!! I want a home like this… 🙁

     
  9. Gr8 post Sharon, can't wait to see more of them.

     
  10. I have heard about the wrap verandahs in Mangalore houses. This is the first tiem I am actually seeing a picture of it. Lovely verandah and detail works.

     
  11. Thanks everyone. This is my pet topic, and I hope to do more work in this area in the future. Will keep you informed. Do write in to me if you have or know of a Mangalore home I can feature.

     
  12. Just got back from a quick 4-day trip of Mangalore (not the city but you know how we refer to everything South Kanara side as M'lore). We now have a home in Kinnigoli – but unfortunately, not much of the old remains. We've kept the tiled roof and some furniture that was left behind by the previous owners.

    Didn't know marble tops existed in M'lore homes. Thought they were mainly found in East Indian Catholic homes.

    Great post as always, Sharon!

     

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